Deutscher-Menzies auction

Here is our preview of the upcoming Deutscher-Menzies auction, scheduled for 13 March 2007, and David’s comments on some of our favourites:

Lot 13 – Clarice Beckett’s special hazy effect always makes her work a little dreamy and romantic. Perhaps it’s just getting too close to my wedding anniversary. I also like what looks like a model T Ford in the centre of the picture. Estimate is $ 8, 000 – $ 12,000.

Lot 65 – I think it was John McDonald who recently wrote a long article on Ray Crooke’s North Queensland work. Anyway, it helped me appreciate the work a lot more. I rather like this lot, particularly the composition and how I am drawn into the picture to the buildings in the middle distance. Estimate of $ 5,000 – $ 8,000 plus GST.

Lot 78 – I do like all John Coburn’s work. Lot 78 however is a rather gritty work from 1959. I think ”tribal”” describes this largish work well (56 x 96 cm, oil on board, estimate $ 25,000 – $ 35,0000 plus GST).

Lot 79 – straight on to the next lot and Polixeni Papapetrou, one of Australia’s most interesting photographic artists. The estimate of $ 1,200 – $ 1,800 seems very reasonable for this work from an edition of 6.

Lot 99 – I really look forward to seeing this work by Douglas Dundas, although it doesn’t say what size it is online. It’s an oil on canvas from 1933, titled “The Domain”. I am a bit of a fan of these historic pieces and the tree looks magnificent. With an estimate of $ 25,000 – $ 35,000 it is Douglas Dundas’ highest priced artwork at auction so far.

Lot 107 – A work by Australia’s most respected and admired contemporary photographer Bill Henson. The darkness and the light in his photographs always just blows me away. His latest photographs sell for around the $ 20,000 mark at exhibition. This work from 1997/98 from an edition of 5, measuring 103 x 152.5 cm, looks like a good buy, estimate of $ 16,000 – $ 20,000.

Lot 120 – In a way, this Hans Heysen water colour has more of an Albert Namatjira feeling about it. The scene is just so majestic, imposing and impressive. It says “I am the Australian Outback – respect me!”. Estimate of $ 9,000 – $12,000

Lot 121 – “The Meet” by Harold Septimus Power. I don’t know quite why I picked this one out. Perhaps because I am so used to seeing his big cumbersome Clydesdale horses. This is a pleasant change. I should also note that Power’s most expensive painting at auction was A Fox Hunt in the Midlands, 1912, which was sold by Deutscher-Menzies last March for $ 78,000. The estimate of $ 3,000 – $ 5,000 seems very good value.

Lot 144 – Everyone should have a work by Tony Tuckson in their collection. If you don’t buy this one, I will… “Seated Girl”, watercolour on paper, Estimate of $ 2,000 – $ 4,000.

Lot 156 – Sam Byrne: Here is one to get you laughing all the way to your credit card to purchase this. You might not like his very rough naïve style and this work is no exception. This is fun – smile please. Estimate of $ 5,000 – $ 7,000.

Lot 165 – I always pick Max Dupain, mainly because his work is so incredibly undervalued. This lot is inspired by Man Ray, a solarised Nude which looks interesting. I don’t know whether I will still like it when I see it in the flesh as it were.

Lot 166 – However, this is my absolute favourite Max Dupain work “Jean with wire mesh” from 1938. This is the work that McCullough’s chose to illustrate Dupain’s work in their new edition of “The New McCulloch’s Encyclopedia of Australian Art”. Good to see they also have excellent taste…

Sticking with the nude theme, I’ve picked two more out for fun.

Lot 195 – J.A. Rudel. Who’s that? Well, I had not heard of him. So I did a bit more checking. Jean Aristide Rudel, 1884 – 1959, French.

Also lot 198 – very Picasso and a bit of fun, estimate $ 4,000 – $ 6,000 by Pasquale Giardino.

Lots 238 and 239 – We purchased a work by Ernest Buckmaster on a client’s behalf last year. That is probably what made me take more notice of his work. There is an amazing consistency in the quality of his work. He was a great advocate of realism and was known for his attacks on modern art in letters to the newspapers of the day. His landscape paintings have a great knack of making you feel that you want to be there. Maybe the Australian Tourist Board should have his images for promotion… Anyway, that’s why I’ve included these two lots.

The Top Priced Lots are:

Lot 30 – John Brack, estimate $ 200,000 – $250,000
Lot 31 – Jeffrey Smart, estimate $ 250,000 – $ 280,000
Lot 32 – Russell Drysdale, estimate $ 900,000 – 1,1 mio + GST
Lot 33 – Brett Whiteley, estimate $ 900,000 – 1,2 mio + GST

Is that a Rembrandt in my Attic?

You suspect you might own a Rembrandt, but were afraid to ask. Maybe you have a watercolour painting or a limited edition print and would like to know more about its value or the artist. Or you are just not sure about its condition or whether it needs re-framing. This is your chance to speak also with the framing experts and ask them all your questions.

On: Saturday, 10 March 2007
From: 10 am to 2 pm
At: Metropolitan Framers, 88 Penshurst Street, Willoughby, NSW
What: Free Art Appraisals

We will be holding a Free Art Appraisal Day in our office – a bit like the Antiques Road Show…

You are most welcome to see us with a work or a photo of it – whether you would like to know the value or whether you are looking to sell a work, after all the art market continues to break records (see Art Updates of 20 February 2007).

You can also email images to info@bhfineart.com if you can’t make it on the day.

The Free Art Appraisal Day is on

Saturday, 3 March 2007
From 10 am to 3 pm
Level 1, 51-53 The Corso, Manly, NSW

The Art Appraisal Day covers all Australian and international works of art, including oil paintings, watercolours, limited edition prints, etchings, photographs and sculpture plus aboriginal artifacts, including paintings on canvas and bark, boomerangs, woomeras, shields etc.

One of our recent exciting finds from a valuation day was an extremely rare painting by Albert Namatjira, titled “Rapid Creek”, Darwin, one of only three paintings known to be in existence of his brief time in Darwin. The Art Appraisal Day covers all Australian and international works of art, including oil paintings, watercolours, limited edition prints, etchings, photographs and sculpture plus aboriginal artifacts, including paintings on canvas and bark, boomerangs, woomeras, shields etc.

One of Banziger Hulme Fine Art’s recent very exciting finds from a valuation day was an extremely rare painting by Albert Namatjira, titled “Rapid Creek”, Darwin, one of only three paintings know to be in existence of his brief time in Darwin. The work has just been sold into a collection in Australia.

The great thing about these art appraisal days is that you never quite know what people are going to walk in with. It can be very exciting, just like the Antiques Road Show on TV.

Of course art works that are brought in do not always have great monetary value. But we are also always very interested to see works of both historical and sentimental value, and perhaps they can just give a little more background to who the artist is or advise on conservation work or re-framing that might be beneficial.

Written by

Brigitte Banziger

Hello, my name is Brigitte Banziger and I am an art consultant and manager at Banziger Hulme Fine Art Consultants, Australia's art valuation and art advice experts. We offer comprehensive art valuation and art brokerage services (selling and buying art on behalf of clients). Our art services cover everything from valuations, art care and restoration, to general advice such as helping define the goals for your art purchase and work out the best strategy on how to achieve those goals, including where, how and and when to buy.

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